Those whose arguments are empty of fact are usually full of shit. --David Porter
Get it out there. Call, write, talk, inform.

Saturday, February 20, 2010

America Needs Health Care Reform

Why does America need Health Care reform?

Top Ten Countries with Highest Life Expectancy:
1.Andorra : 83.51
2.Macau (near China): 82.19
3.San Marino (near Italy): 81.71
4.Singapore: 81.81
5.Hong Kong: 81.59
6.Japan: 81.25
7.Sweden: 80.51
8.Switzerland: 80.51
9.Australia: 80.50
10.Guernsey (in the English Channel): 80.42

Worst Ten Countries by Life Expectancy:

1.Swaziland: 32.63
2.Botswana: 33.74
3.Lesotho: 34.40
4.Zimbabwe: 39.29
5.Liberia: 39.65
6.Mozambique: 39.82
7.Zambia: 40.03
8.Sierra Leone: 40.22
9.Malawi: 41.70
10.South Africa: 42.73
11.Djibouti: 43.17

Other Countries of Interest Not in the Top 10:
Canada: 80.22
Italy: 79.81
France: 79.73
Germany: 78.80
United Kingdom: 78.54
United States: 77.85
Mexico: 75.41
China: 72.58
Iraq: 69.08
Russia: 67.08

Another list from the U.N. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_life_expectancy

Infant Mortality Rate by Country (source: the U.S. C.I.A.)

This entry gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.

On this list, the lower you are on the list, the more baby deaths you have.
In infant mortality, the U.S. has MORE baby deaths than the U.K., ALL the Nordic countries, South Korea, and even Slovenia. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2091rank.html

180 United States 6.22 2009 est.
194 United Kingdom4.85 2009 est.
198 Netherlands4.73 2009 est.
203 Denmark4.34 2009 est.
204 Korea, South4.26 2009 est.
221 Japan2.79 2009 est.

Below is a list of industrialized countries with some form of universal health care. These countries are populated with borderline Commies who have outrageous taxes and horrendous doctors. These countries are full of waiting rooms, which are filled with sick, sick pinko people. This is sarcasm. Please refer to the list “Top Ten Countries with Highest Life Expectancy” How many countries with highest life expectancy are also on the list of countries that have Universal, government-run health care? Coincidence? No.

Austria
Belgium
Canada
Denmark
France
Germany
Greece
Iceland
Ireland
Italy
Luxembourg
Netherlands
Norway
Portugal
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
United Kingdom
Japan
Finland
Australia
New Zealand
Czech Republic
South Korea
Hungary
Poland
Slovakia

The two “modern” countries that do not have UHC?
United States
Mexico

Why do we need health care reform? We need it so that a bureaucrat doesn't get between you and your doctor, like below.

Parents of five-year old sue health insurance company
By Diana Sweet Wednesday, February 10th, 2010 -- 2:32 am

A health insurance provider is under fire for refusing to pay for a treatment that might save a young boy's life.
Five-year-old Kyler VanNocker of Pennsylvania is ailing from a lethal childhood cancer known as neuroblastoma, and his insurer HealthAmerica is refusing to pay for the only known treatment that can save his life, reports Ronnie Polaneczky for the Philadelphia Daily News. Let me repeat, his insurer--not the govt.--is ignoring what his doctor is prescribing--treatment for neuroblastoma.

In response, VanNocker's parents Paul and Maria have filed a lawsuit against the insurance company (not the govt.) claiming its alleged decision to refuse coverage for their son is based on "a biased, self-serving misreading and misinterpretation" of his medical records and their own policies.

"These companies have to be brought to the courthouse to get them to do the right thing," David Senoff, the attorney representing the VanNockers told the Daily News, suggesting the five-year-old will die if he does not receive care.

HealthAmerica's apparent rationale is that the efficacy of the treatment in question, MIGB therapy, has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and is not substantiated strongly by "peer-reviewed" medical literature.

17-Pound, 4-Month-Old Baby Denied Health Insurance for Being Too Fat
Tuesday , October 13, 2009

Nothing brings a smile to an adult's face quicker than the sight of a happy, chubby baby.

But the sight of 4-month-old Alex Lange, who measures 25-inches long and weighs 17 pounds, is bringing a frown to the hypothetical face of insurance company Rocky Mountain Health Plans, The Denver Post reported on its Web site Monday.

Insurance Underwriters, the people who are in charge of assessing risk for insurance companies, have decided that baby Alex's pre-existing condition — obesity — makes him a high-risk patient and have denied him coverage.

His parents were shocked.

"I could understand if we could control what he's eating. But he's 4 months old. He's breast-feeding. We can't put him on the Atkins diet or on a treadmill," joked his frustrated father, Bernie Lange, a part-time news anchor at KKCO-TV in Grand Junction. "There is just something absurd about denying an infant."

Bernie and Kelli Lange tried to get insurance with Rocky Mountain Health Plans when their current insurer raised their rates 40 percent after Alex was born.

Why do we need health care reform?

So that insurance companies that make billions in profits already cannot become even more greedy.

Anthem Blue Cross Raises Rates Up To 39 Percent
By Kenny Goldberg February 5, 2010

California — Californians who have individual policies with Anthem Blue Cross will soon be paying much higher premiums. The insurer will raise rates up to 39 percent beginning next month.

About 800,000 Californians have individual health policies with Anthem Blue Cross. They've been receiving letters notifying them of premium increases, and some customers will pay thousands more a year.

Shana Alex Lavarreda is with the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. She says individual policy holders have to pay whatever the insurer wants.

"When you don't have a big group negotiating on your behalf, it's entirely set based on your own medical history, in most cases," Alex Lavarreda points out. "I mean, these pre-existing conditions. I mean, living is a pre-existing condition in many cases."

Anthem Blue Cross says it shares its members' concerns over the rising cost of health care. At the same time, the insurer says it may increase premiums a number of times during the year.

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